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of the internet and it more than anywhere else. new york, london, tokyo. there are interesting outliers. places like ashford, virginia and another not far from dulles airport. you asked the engineers where the v that is, they would take new york, los angeles, and ashford. theyere the cetnernter is, would say new york, los angeles, hford.wn for -- asked for i you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall are very generic. deliberately so. they try to hide inside when you tried id.. a try to hide them in plain sight. others have operators -- what operators like to call a science fiction movie. that is deliberate. it are modeled after science fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. when you walk in, it is a bit like walking into a machine. the buildings are incredibly loud and cold from the air- conditioners that keep the machines cool. you cannot see the ceiling. there are usually cages around. big steel cages about half the size of a hotel room. each belongs to a network. that is wher
as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over 580 billion gallons of water. almost all of the system is fed by gravity, w
is not about the federal budget it's about his family's. jim axelrod, cbs news, west new york, new jersey. >> early this morning a tentative deal was reached to end the strike that shut down this nation's largest port complex. workers are expected to return to work this morning. clerks at the ports of los angeles and long beach, california had been on strike for eight days. the deal was reached hours after federal mediators entered the talk. the port handles a billion dollars worth of cargo a day. >> the flu season has gotten off to an early jump. and in one county in tennessee, closing classes for the rest of the week. this year's strain of the virus is more severe. >> reporter: if you haven't had your flu shot yet, now is the time. health officials say this is the earliest start of the flu season in nearly a decade. centers for disease control says alabama, louisiana, mississippi, tennessee and texas are all reporting higher than normal cases. >> we usually see flu begin to have an uptick in about four to six weeks from now. so seeing it this early could will predict not only a longer b
? a newspaper in new york says yes and publishes the name of those who have gun permits. >>> christmas is over but shopping is not. if you're heading out to return the gift that wasn't exactly what you wanted, you will not be alone. >>> tom cruise may not be the ideal action hero but his love life made it into the top ten. "newsroom" starts now. girnlgs low. the day after christmas means relaxing or wracking up deals at the mall. for people in the west and the south it's cleanup after severe weather ripped through the region. waterspout was located in lake pontchartrain. parts of arkansas saw several inches of snow and snapping power lines and of course canceling flights. in mississippi the governor declared a state of emergency after at least eight counties reported damage. strong winds and heavy rains made the commute along this stretch of i-20 east of jackson a difficult one to say the least. it added up to a chaotic christmas day for a good chunk of the country. >> oh my god look, that's a tornado. oh, wow. >> reporter: skies over mobile, alabama, turned ominous as the storms approached. r
receiving very heavy rain but the emphasis for snow will be further inland especially upstate new york and northern interior new england and eventually maine is going to be getting in on the act as well. that's where the winter storm warnings are in effect. and a notice they are not in effect along the i-95 corridor. again, that's where we're expecting it to mostly be in the form of rain like it has been throughout most of the day. additional snow as we go through the next 24 hours. you could see 12 inches or more where some of those areas are in purple, but, again, along the coast, we're talking 1 inch or less and this time around, again, it looks like it's mainly going to be just rain. i'm david bernard for cbs news, miami. >>> at least six deaths are blamed on the storm system in the southeast. the trouble with tornados in hard-hit arkansas, nearly 200,000 people lost power, and the governor declared a statewide emergency. danielle nottingham reports. >> reporter: snow blanketed parts of the midwest and northeast. falling and blowing so hard it was difficult for road crews to keep u
leaders have only hours to reach an agreement. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton is in a new york city hospital this morning being treated for a blood clot related to her concussion earlier this month. >>> and feats of bravery on a frozen lake. a half dozen people fall through a sheet of life while trying to save a man from freezing cold water. captioning funded by cbs >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for monday december 31st 2012. good morning, everybody, on this new year's eve. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. secretary of state hillary clinton is being treated for a blood clot. doctors found it following a concussion. marlie hall is at presbyterian hospital this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, terrell. mrs. clinton will spend the morning at the hospital as doctors keep her under close watch. they say she'll be under observation for 48 hours. as you mentioned, a blood clot was mentioned after she came in for a routine exam. it was a follow-up actually to a concussion that she suffered earlier this month. now she has been given blo
was described as smart, caring, and rambunctious. jack pinto loved the new york giants. he was buried in the jersey of his favorite player, giants wide receiver victor cruz. >> there were stories about jack being in heaven, tossing footballs at the angels and knocking halos off of their head. everyone got a chuckle out of that. >> reporter: konan funeral home in newtown will hold 11 funerals between now and christmas. newtown school officials have set up grief counselors for students still dealing with the tragedy. tarle -- terrell? >> good to see you. thank you very much. >>> the grim task of telling the parents of 20 young children they would never see their son or daughter again fell to connecticut's governor, dannel malloy. the parents were brought to the town fire house on friday. yesterday an emotional malloy explained he didn't think it was right for families to have to wait a long time for the families of victims to be notified. >> there was a reluctance to tell parents and loved ones that the person that they were waiting for was not going to return and that that had gone on
his family's. jim axelrod, cbs news, west new york, new jersey. >> pelley: well, a lot of families with tight budgets will be happy to hear this next story: the housing market is coming back. we got a report today that says home prices in october had their biggest gain in six years. up more than 6%. sales have been rising, too. we haven't seen news like this since the housing meltdown. bill whitaker shows us what it looks like in southern california. >> reporter: los angeles contractor steve andolin routinely has five or six houses under construction before the crash. the recession cut that in half. what are you seeing as far as this market? >> well, definitely an improvement in sale price. prices are going up. >> reporter: he's now hiring more builders, plumbers, electricians, jobs that in l.a. pay $25 to $40 an hour. >> people were scared before and now people have a little bit more confidence and are willing to act. >> reporter: perhaps even feeling pressure to buy. elana giplable has been house hunting for more than a year. she's noticed something new, competition. >> you feel
states under winter storm warnings right now. pennsylvania, new york, massachusetts, new hampshire, vermont and maine. all could see a foot of snow or more. more than 200,000 customers spanning several states already without power. 1,700 plus flights canceled yesterday. imagine that. hundreds more already taken off the board this morning. there are six deaths being blamed on the weather since tuesday and the threat hasn't passed yesterday. bonnie schneider, meteorologist checking the system from the cnn center in atlanta. first, we go to ennis standing by in miserable, snowy new york. it's a pretty picture, ines. >> reporter: you can still see the snowfall here. and this area is expected to get anywhere from 9 to 13 inches here in syracuse and in some other areas of new york, up to 18 inches. and i'll tell you that the snowplows have been working 12-hour shifts throughout the day yesterday and evening. they were spreading salt before the storm in anticipation of the storm. this area is used to getting a lot of snowstorm. two years ago they got almost 180 inches of snowfall. and so
. president obama has nominated john kerry to be her replacement. >> marlie hall in new york this morning. >>> also today is the final day of fiscal cliff negotiations. hope of reaching a wide-ranging deal in automatic spending increases and tax cuts is all but gone. spending would be reduced and cuts would be felt in all areas of the government. economies have warned that going over the cliff would cause a spike in unemployment and trigger another recession. this morning the senate reconvenes with the aim of reaching a smaller deal, one that might spare millions of americans from paying her taxes. danielle nottingham reporting now from washington. >> lawmakers are still working on it. >> i want everyo one to know i' willing to get this done but i need dance partner. >> the main sticking point between democrats and republicans continues to be over the threshold of tax increases. president obama campaigned on raising taxes on income over $250,000 while many congressional republicans have pushed back against any tax increases. president obama is placing the blame for the impasse on the gop.
. and syracuse, new york, with nearly a foot of snow and counting in some areas. and that's where we begin here tonight, with abc's john schriffen leading us off. >> reporter: whiteout conditions in ohio. power poles snapped like twigs in arkansas. and this pickup truck in southern illinois, struggling just to clear a path. the winter blast, now accounting for 15 deaths. most of them on the nation's roads, where black ice led to accident after accident. >> i lost count of the number of cars i've seen in the ditch. i saw a jackknifed tractor trailer. i saw a horse trailer that was turned over. >> reporter: today, the northeast was digging out. this man spent hours trying to rescue his car here in syracuse. what is it like dealing with this much snow? >> a lot of agony. a lot of back breaking. >> reporter: mother nature is also wreaking havoc in the skies. today alone, close to 700 flights were canceled. in the past 48 hours? nearly 3,000. on new york's long island, this southwest airlines plane skidded off the runway, getting stuck in the mud. 129 passengers evacuated safely. >> tower southwest
showers along the carolina coast and for south florida, as well. >> 50s from atlanta to new york. 40s in the midwest and rockies. 27 in fargo. 37 in the twin cities. and 50s from omaha to dallas. >>> and when we come back this morning, music and money. the woman who earned more than any other female singer this year. >>> and music to the ears of anyone that's is sick and tired of blaring tv ads. why you're going to get a break from the loud commercials starting today. >>> then, a ghost story caught on tape. the tv report that turned pretty haunting. i tried decongestants... i tossed and turned... i even vaporized. and then i fought back with drug-free breathe right. these nasal strips instantly open my nose, like a breath of fresh air. i was breathing and sleeping better. for the first time, the federal reserve is going to link interest rates to a specific unemployment number. fed chairman ben bernanke has announced rates will remain ultralow until the jobless rate drops below 6.5%. something that he says might not happen for at least three more years. >>> and the owners of more than
platform. "the new york post" cover that has the paper in hot water this morning. >> plus we have the 911 tapes and the alleged murder/suicide involving kansas city chiefs play er javon belcher. >>> and there's no plan to keep us from going over the fiscal cliff. broken record, broken record. i'm christine romans in today for john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. >>> up first, president obama standing his ground over the fight in the fiscal cliff. americans face crushing tax hikes and severe spending cuts in 27 days if democrats and republicans cannot come together on a deal. by the way, congress breaks for the holidays in ten days. slash that number. in an interview with bloomberg news, the president made it crystal clear he's not about to blink on the issue of tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. >> we'll have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> white house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. very nice to see you, dan. >> good to see you. >> here's the deal. we have republicans pitted
scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
if your neighbor owns a gun? a new york paper thinks so, they published a map of people with gun permits and we'll talk to someone who is on that list in just a minute. >>> a snag for thousands of holiday travelers, the killer winter storm arrives in the northeast, we're already seeing long delays, hundreds of flights canceled, and highway traffic snarled. $1.1 billion toyota agrees to settle a class action lawsuit over unintended acceleration and also installed new safety features and a shark tank in a shopping mall explodes, sending sharks flying everywhere and shoppers running for their lives. newsroom starts now. >>> good morning, i'm carol costello. jobless claims fall to a four-year low. alison kosik joins us from the new york stock exchange to tell us more. >> this winds up being a big improvement for jobless claims number falling 12,000 last week to 350,000, and what that means is that the level now is close to the lowest level since the early part of the recession, so it really shows these layoffs are slowing. something interesting has been happening in the past several weeks. t
priority is rhapsodizing like a bohemian. >> cnn, new york. >> the news continues next on cnn. >> they are trying to find a last minute compromise to keep us from going over the fiscal cliff, respect senator olympia snowe is saying that it's a bigger sign of a bigger crisis. >> what is deeply troubling is you cannot get congress and the president to reach any agreement on anything. >> the latest on the fiscal cliff negotiations in a few minutes. a 31-year-old woman has been charged with second degree murder as a hate crime in connection with a subway death in new york city. they identified the woman as erica ericamenendez in new york. the victim was a store owner and graphic designer. witnesses described a womani pacing the platform and talking to herself before pushing the victim on the tracks as a train entered the stadium. the video shows a woman running from the scene. a airliner smashed into a highway in russia. four of the crew were killed, no passengers were on board and no one on the highway was injured. it was arriving when it over shot the run way. a lot of celebrati
that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we started on this project in 1969. i'm a sandhog. i've been a sandhog for 37 years. narrator: sandhogs are the men of local 147, who work deep below the city. they began building the infrastructure of new york in 1872. from the subways to the sewers, the water tunnels to the highway tunnels, new york city thrives because of their work. ryan: you got one little hole in the ground, and nobody knows we're here. see the empire state building, right. that's 1,000
vÍctimas de sandy en new york y nueva jersey. y a un mes de tomar posesiÓn como presidente de venezuela. hugo chÁvez, sigue sin aparecer. se completan 21 dÍas, de silencio, total. vamos con toda la informaciÓn. este es su noticiero univisiÓn. ediciÓn nocturna. con ilia calderÓn y enrique acevedo. buenas noches. y les habla felix. el impacto por la entrada en vigor del consumo de marihuana con fines recreativos en el estado de washington. mientras aquÍ cientos de personas salieron a festejar y a fumar la haoer va en latinoamÉrica se preguntan si tiene sentido, la dura gerba contra el narcotrÁfico. que allÍ se libra >>> nos trae un amplio panorama. la cuenta regresiva. espera que las campanas del reloj marque la 1 de la medianoche. y el uso recreativo de la marihuana. el as pirarla es le. . los residente elling del estado washington tienen opiniones divididas. >>> me parece muy bueno que lo a probarÁn el gobierno puede ejercer mÁs control. la lady ze que no pueden fui maya en lugares pÚblicos al parecer las autoridades decidieron cerrar los ojos por una horas. para permitirle
and that is what he was searching for. many classmates call him barry and when he got to new york, those four years in new york city people call him barry and some call him barack. >> host: why did he choose occidental and why transfer to colombia? >> guest: he of people who were going there and the way he tells the story, there was a girly in honolulu who was in that area so he got that -- it was like the next step. it was comfortable, beautiful, small, elite, california sunshine, very comfortable. it was an important two years. restarted to expand intellectually. he got his first sense of destiny in those two years but left because it was too -- he wanted to experience the world and was finding himself. taken to los angeles, to new york and chicago but it is important to get to new york first. he starts his junior year. >> host: his first night in new york city. >> i was a little dubious but turns out to be true. he was not that spending night in that apartment would be better, but he couldn't get in. he couldn't get the keys and couldn't find the landlord, a friend of a friend of his mother, he
. and making a mess of flight schedules at major hubs from chicago, cleveland, philly and new york. cbs reporter danielle nottingham is at reagan national airport. danielle. >> reporter: liz, airlines are still trying to catch up at this hour. today is considered one of the busiest days to fly during the holiday season. and airports all the way from texas to new york have struggled to move travelers along today. mobile, alabama is still cleaning up a day after storm ripped roofs from homes and shattered car windows. the porch at this home was destroyed. 34 tornadoes hit the southeast, the most ever in the u.s. on christmas day. years of drought in texas made the dry trees vulnerable to high winds. in arkansas, more than a foot of snow made for a rare day of sledding. more than 200,000 people have no power in the south. as the storm heads east, heavy rain is flooding parts of south carolina, blowing snow causing white-out conditions in indiana and ohio. and blizzard warnings are posted as far north as maine. this storm is wrecking travel plans. more than 900 flights have been canceled ac
jersey, much needed temporary housing. and in new york tonight, there are new questions about why politicians for decades didn't heed warnings about what could happen if a superstorm like sandy came ashore. katie? >> reporter: good evening, lester. there was a 14-foot storm surge here on lower manhattan, completely submerging this subway station. the damage is so bad here, they don't know when ore if they'll ever by able to open it. swamped subways. >> a record storm surge here in the new york city area. >> reporter: massive power outages and beach front neighborhoods leveled. while officials say sandy was unprecedented, it wasn't entirely unexpected. for three decades, officials were told to prepare for a storm of historic proportions and a l law. >> nobody's taken the political courage to say, here's the standard for prepareness, here's the standard for recovery, we're going to help you fund it and then we're going to punish you if you don't get is there. >> reporter: three state reports since 1975 focused on preparedness, one addressed new york's preparability saying the sea le
. >> reporter: angela bosco is the manager of this program in hauppauge, new york. out of work since march she got thatjob because of a government grant that only hires those who ire unemployed. d i never would imagine it riuld take a hurricane to bring me to a county position. it was like a blessing, actually. >> reporter: with tons of debris still left to clean up from hurricane sandy, the state themployment arrest almost 9%, this program hopes to solve two problems at once-- getting all of this cleaned up, getting people back to work. the super storm leveled businesses across new york. this program is aimed at the 50,000 new yorkers who lost heir jobs, according to governor andrew cuomo. if so what this program says is if we can employ people who were ity, that community, hurt by the acorm, and actually employ them eb rebuild their community, that's a win-win. >> reporter: but these programs will need more money to work. are you going to go back to the president and ask for that extra money you didn't get this first hime around? >> getting the $60 billion quickly means a lot to this state
.s. and canada are traveling to western new york to attend the memorial services for two fallen heroes. they were shot and killed on crime eve. the shooter killed himself at scene and had served 17 years in prison for killing his mother. a woman allegedly helped purchase the weapon. the community is coming together that all the visiting firefighters have a place to stay. many of them will be staying at hampton inn there for free. >> gregg: new developments in the investigation of a subway shoving death in new york city. police saying a woman is in custody after she made statements implicating herself. investigators released this sketch after the incident. they say the victim died thursday night when a woman pushed him on to the tracks in front of an oncoming train. surveillance video shows the suspect running away afterwards. name of the woman in custody is being withheld pending formal charges. >> arthel: is military facing a new threat? mandatory spending cuts putting pressure on the pentagon. can it still do the job of protecting america if a zeal not reached in washington? >> gregg: just days
portions of new york. south of there, all along the i- 95 corridor through new york and philly and d.c. and south of there, very heavy rain occurring this evening, and that's going to be the story overnight. and it looks like even into tomorrow that heavy rain is likely going to continue. >> axelrod: how bad will this disrupt travel? >> well, i think the big problem is going to be the snowfall in the inland areas. let's give an idea of how much more snow could fall between now and early saturday when the storm ends. those purple areas you see anywhere from northern pennsylvania, covering much of upstate new york, and northern new england, could see over a foot or more, maybe even locally two feet of snow in some of the higher elevations. if you take a look at the i-95 area, though, only maybe a very light amount of snow, an inch or so, in the cities. that looks like it's mainly going to be rain. but even all that heavy rain into tomorrow morning is likely going to slow down air traffic, and i think today's delays are probably going to fold over into tomorrow, as well. >> axelrod: dav
of what over people may do when they hit puddles or something. >> reporter: in syracuse, new york, plows are working overtime. this car stuck with no place to go. >> the weather was bad. the winds were bad. blowing the cars around. you could see the semis were swerving. >> reporter: it's the city's first snowstorm of the season. many are bracing for more to come. john schriffen, abc news, new york. >> all right, thanks, john. >>> one area of severe weather to keep an eye on. accuweather meteorologist andrew baglini has the latest. >> we're tracking a disturbance that will give us bad weather. eastern texas around the houston area, thunderstorms will pop up. that spreads eastward throughout christmas tuesday. interstates 10 and 20, large hail, damaging wind gusts, the threat for tornado. a destructive storm system on this tuesday. the highest threat for tornadoes around new orleans, mobile, interstate 10 northward into the panhandle of florida. good snow across portions of the plains. >> i hate to see rough weather this time of the year. >>> let's look at weather from across the country.
's not a lot of optimism that it can be cone in time. jonathan karl, abc news, new york. >>> tributes are pouring in for retired general norman schwartzcopf. the general, nicknamed stormin' norman, died yesterday in tampa from pneumonia. he commanded a coalition of some 30 countries that drove iraqi forces from kuwait back in 1991. in retirement, he supported charitable causes and resisting calls to rub for public office. norman schwartzcopf was 78. >>> for the second time this month, a man has been pushed to his death in the path of a new york subway train. last night, a woman shoved the man on the tracks just as the train was pulling into the station on queens. it's not clear if she knew the victim. new york police are reviewing surveillance video recorded on the platform to try to identify the victim and the suspect. >> this is the second time this happened this month. the first one happened in times square. this one happened in queens. i love the fact that new york city has a subway system. but every time i'm putting my back against the wall. >> you're not the only one. there are
he made racial comments about jeremy lin, the new york knicks and now houston rockets basketball player who is asian-american. when he he starts to talk about you in these terms, you know, this is in line with ma marginalizing what you had to say which was a totally legitimate comment about the white establishment going into lower numbers because of the rise in terms of blacks and hispanics. now he wants to make you out to be master of some big house. how ridiculous. let me tell you something. if he's asked to be on your show, the most popular show on cable tv, he should have regarded it as an honor and opportunity to have platform to speak out as a free black man. he's somehow twisted this in an attempt to make it racial, to make you into a bad guy, and that is an attack on honest debate in this country. i have written a book about it. they're trying to put a muzzlele on you, bill. they want muzzles on me when i say i'm in favor of school reform. this is madness. >> how do you see it? >> it's hateful and nasty and often the people who claim to be as open minded and tolerant amon
in places you'd expect; new york, london, frankfurt, tokyo, with a couple of really interesting outliers. and in the outliers was a lot of my story, places like ashford, virginia, where if you ask the network engineers that i spent a lot of time with, they would say, oh, new york, london, los angeles, ashburn, not as if it were this tiny suburb. so it's a surprisingly short list of places that are by far the hot spots, the kind of supernodes on the internet. >> host: what did these supernodes look like, mr. blum, when you visit them? >> guest: well, from the outside, they look a bit like you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall. they are quite generic from the outside, deliberately so. they try to hide in plain sight, at least when you're driving by them. inside some of them are in, um, are in old kind of art deco buildings that used to belong to western union or old telecom palaces. others are kind of, have what their operators like to call a cyberific look, kind of the aesthetic adjective of choice, meaning they kind of look like a science fiction movie, and that's deliberate.
will see is it will mix in with another storm. new york city, southern connecticut, and south of boston going to get the biggest snow totals. let me show you what you can expect in the way of snow totals. the pink area is two to five inches, broad brush across parts of pennsylvania. upstate new york, you'll see a little bit more. see that maroon spot south of boston? that's where we get the five to ten-inch area. near a foot south of boston locally. it's going to be an interesting one. here at the airports, boston and new york included, in heavy delays today. and you have moderate delays back here. detroit, chicago, some cold and some wind going to affect them. los angeles will have rain. so, it doesn't just stop on the east coast. we have travel trouble in other places. but on the roads, anywhere in the pacific northwest could be a little slippery. and certainly, with this storm, again, from ohio all the way to maine. back to bianna. >> a travel nightmare for so many people. ginger, thank you. >>> we're going to turn to the desperate, last-ditch effort to try to keep the country from f
. jon schriffen, abc news, new york. >> should be fascinating what answer they come up with. obviously, it's best known for those fiery images. but in its heyday, that was the fastest and most comfortable way to get across the atlantic. so it was a milestone at the time. of course, we remember how it ended, just like the "titanic." we remember the tragedy, not the accomplishment. >> that was the first trip from europe to north america of the 1937 and they didn't have a full airship, only 36 passengers. at that time in 1937, $400 per ticket, one way, $720 round trip. think of what that would cost in today's parameters. >> no kidding. we'll get answers perhaps on sunday. >>> well before jon stewart and steven colbert, political satire was in the pages of "mad" magazine. >> and now "mad" is celebrating 60 years of poking fun. it's coming up on "world news now." >> announcer: "world ♪ ♪ mad world mad world >>> nice song choice, guys. "mad" magazine is celebrating 60 years of making fun of the american landscape with a brand new book. >> it's called "totally mad -- 60 years of humor, sa
uncertainty. >> that's unwelcome news for hundreds who lined up at a job fair in new york on wednesday. >> basically i'm looking for anything that pays american dollars. >> ben bernanke says 2013 will bring more jobs and better economic growth but only if congress strikes a deal. now, even if they do strike a deal, some here say the delays have jeopardized the chances of this becoming legislation and passing both houses of congress in time, and there's a question whether speaker boehner will even have enough republican votes to pass any deal they might come, to terrell. >> susan mcginnis in washington this morning. thank you, susan. >>> ben bernanke also had big news for investors. the feds taking unprecedented action in keeping interest rates at their record-low levels. erica ferrari is here in new york with that. erica, good morning to you. >> good morning, terrell. for the first time ever, the fed said they would link its actions to specific economic milestones. they said they'll keep the interest rate to 0% until the unemployment rate falls to below 6.5%. the jobless rate may not r
new york still don't know what prompted an ex-con to gun down a group of firefighters. the gunman lured them to his neighborhood in the town of webster by setting a fire to a car and house. two firefighters were killed in the ambush. this morning, officials are looking for more victims. we have more from webster, new york. good morning. >> reporter: duarte, as investigators work to find out why two firefighters were killed, the whole town of webster is grieving this christmas. it's a day that should be about celebration. candles are burning for two firefighters killed in an ambush the day before christmas. >> our men are hurt, and they're not going to be home with their families now. >> reporter: police believe 62-year-old william spengler intentionally set fire to a house and car in order to lure first responders to his neighborhood. >> i'm sorry. i just -- >> reporter: that's okay. >> it's -- christmas. i mean, who targets people on -- >> reporter: authorities say spengler injured two volunteer firefighters and killed two more before killing himself. 19-year-old michael chiapper
to 700 flights were canceled. in the past 48 hours? nearly 3,000. on new york's long island, this southwest airlines plane skidded off the run way, getting stuck in the mud. 129 passengers evacuated safely. >> tower southwest 4695. we just made your day very exciting, at least ours is going to be. we just tack sied off into the grass. >> reporter: right outside the snow zone, be you still in nature's path, seabright, new jersey. today, the streets flooded again. and back here in syracuse, crews have cleared many of the main roads, moving these mountains of snow, but tonight, the fear, as the temperature drops, the slush turns to ice, making travel even more difficult. authorities say if you don't have to be out here, stay home. david? >> john schriffen leading us off tonight in syracuse, new york. i want to bring in the chief meteorologist harvey leonard. you were telling us, another big part of the story, the snow and the rain and the winds there in new england. >> great to be working with you, david. i got to tell you, the winds gusted to hurricane force along the coast of
, that was interesting. new york values went up as well. lori: markets are scattered. that is a debate over what the fines wealth in america, cost of living, property values, you can't have one single threshold the works across the board because -- lori: bringing it back to taxes. melissa: i love it. lori: and $8 billion deal, what does it mean for the future of trading? charlie gasparino will be along with exclusive details. melissa: look at how the dollar is fairing, the market up slightly and with that, currencies are weaker across the board. we will be right back. melissa: we want to take you to capitol hill, john boehner. >> the president called on the house again and again to pass a bill to protect 98% of the american people from a tax hike. today we will do better than that. our bill will protect 99.81% of the american people from an increase in taxes. it is permanent tax relief for individuals. a permanent hatch on the alternative minimum tax, the marriage penalty, death tax relief and permanent extension of higher child tax credit and capital gains and dividends rates we see today. all
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